Apparently I seemed calm and alert and okay, today, according to my psychiatrist. It’s probably somewhat comparably true, but it is bugging me a little, given how melodramatic I end up feeling if I’m at all distressed when I see him.

I mean, if I’m honest, I guess there’s a fair bit of ‘the last month has been kinda unrelentingly awful, but I’m feeling a little more resolved in terms of future plans’ that’s probably improving my disposition, but, idk, there’s this weird element of feeling really uncomfortable about being seen as “doing well” by someone who is supposed to be helping me deal with my wellness deficiencies.

Which is kinda ironically hilarious given how horrified I get with myself when pretty much anyone else notices I’m not okay.

I never was very good at sense-making.

Realised last night that I basically shoved all of my feelings into a box to get through last week. Given a major point of treatment this year was to get better at *not* doing that so I could stop periodically collapsing, I’m more convinced that the changes I’ve been ambivalent about lately really do need to happen, even though they’re scary and unsettling and difficult.

1 note

And critical hard drive failure on the laptop.

*lies down on the floor*

0 notes

gazztron:

fannishflightsoffancy:

jennifergearing:

Bars next door to each other down the road from my house. Yup.

jen can we go to one, then the other, one day?

JEN CAN WE GO TO ONE AND THEN THE OTHER WHILE I’M THERE? 

I don’t know if Montague will be open yet when you’re here, but if it is, we can definitely go :)

gazztron:

fannishflightsoffancy:

jennifergearing:

Bars next door to each other down the road from my house. Yup.

jen can we go to one, then the other, one day?

JEN CAN WE GO TO ONE AND THEN THE OTHER WHILE I’M THERE?

I don’t know if Montague will be open yet when you’re here, but if it is, we can definitely go :)

28 notes

Bars next door to each other down the road from my house. Yup.

Bars next door to each other down the road from my house. Yup.

28 notes

ranterist:

But how do we talk libertarians out of thinking and acting like four-year-olds…

ranterist:

But how do we talk libertarians out of thinking and acting like four-year-olds…

(Source: cramulus, via notemily)

1,031 notes

houdinigenie:

excuse me ma’am that’s fucking rude


I think you mean impressive as hell.

houdinigenie:

excuse me ma’am that’s fucking rude

I think you mean impressive as hell.

(via kidhedera)

15,497 notes

Having a boss with mental illness literacy is awesome. The fact that his boss is somewhat empathy deficient (his words) is less so.

Basically, looking for another job is on the cards, with plans in discussion for keeping me at a manageable level of function until I can manage to find a new job.

The last couple of weeks has meant that’s been a concept in my head for a bit, but making it a more solid plan is a bit scary. :/

probablyasocialecologist:

Agrivoltaics - Farming food and fuel, side by side
Image: Courtney White

What is the best way to utilize sunlight—to grow food or to produce fuel?
For millennia, the answer was easy: we used solar energy to grow plants that we could eat. Then, in the 1970s, the answer became more complex as fields of photovoltaic panels (PVPs) began popping up all over the planet, sometimes on former farmland. In the 1990s, farmers began growing food crops for fuels such as corn-based ethanol. The problem is that the food-fuel equation has become a zero-sum game.
That led French agricultural scientist Christian Dupraz to ponder whether both food and fuel production could be successfully combined on one plot of land. For example, why not build solar panels above a farm field so that electricity and food can be produced simultaneously? In addition to resolving the conflict between land uses, solar panels would provide an additional source of income to farmers while at the same time sheltering crops from the rising temperatures and destructive hail and rain storms associated with climate change.
In 2010, Dupraz and his colleagues at INRA, France’s agricultural research institute, built the first-ever “agrivoltaic” farm, near Montpellier. In an 860-square-meter field, they planted crops in four adjacent plots—two in full sun as controls, one under a standard-density array of PVPs, and one under a half-density array of PVPs.
The researchers assumed crop productivity would decline in the shade, since plants would have to compete with solar panels for radiation and possibly water. But they also wondered whether, in a warming world, shade might actually improve crop productivity. “Shade will reduce transpiration needs and possibly increase water efficiency,” Dupraz wrote. The key would be finding the right balance between electricity produced by the solar panels and productive capacity of the farm.
At the end of three growing seasons, the researchers found that compromise was indeed possible. Not surprisingly, the crops under the full-density PVP shading lost nearly 50 percent of their productivity, compared to similar crops in the full-sun plots. However, the crops under the half-density shading were just as productive as the ones in the unshaded control plots; in a few cases, they were even more productive. (1)
The reason for this surprising outcome, according to Hélène Marrou, who studied lettuce in the plots, was the ability of plants to adapt to lower light conditions. She reported that lettuce plants adjusted by increasing their leaf area and by altering leaf arrangement to harvest light more efficiently.
She also had good news to report on the water front. “We showed in this experiment that shading irrigated vegetable crops with PVPs allowed a saving of 14 percent to 29 percent of evapotranspired water, depending on the level of shade created and the crop grown,” she wrote in a 2013 paper. (2) Within the context of global warming and water shortage, she said, reducing water demand by shading plants could represent a big advantage in the near future.

Source
Further reading:
Solar farms can enhance biodiversity and sequester soil carbon too
The Navy’s Plan to Beam Down Energy From Orbiting Solar Panels
Report: A Solar Transition is Possible

probablyasocialecologist:

Agrivoltaics - Farming food and fuel, side by side

Image: Courtney White

What is the best way to utilize sunlight—to grow food or to produce fuel?

For millennia, the answer was easy: we used solar energy to grow plants that we could eat. Then, in the 1970s, the answer became more complex as fields of photovoltaic panels (PVPs) began popping up all over the planet, sometimes on former farmland. In the 1990s, farmers began growing food crops for fuels such as corn-based ethanol. The problem is that the food-fuel equation has become a zero-sum game.

That led French agricultural scientist Christian Dupraz to ponder whether both food and fuel production could be successfully combined on one plot of land. For example, why not build solar panels above a farm field so that electricity and food can be produced simultaneously? In addition to resolving the conflict between land uses, solar panels would provide an additional source of income to farmers while at the same time sheltering crops from the rising temperatures and destructive hail and rain storms associated with climate change.

In 2010, Dupraz and his colleagues at INRA, France’s agricultural research institute, built the first-ever “agrivoltaic” farm, near Montpellier. In an 860-square-meter field, they planted crops in four adjacent plots—two in full sun as controls, one under a standard-density array of PVPs, and one under a half-density array of PVPs.

The researchers assumed crop productivity would decline in the shade, since plants would have to compete with solar panels for radiation and possibly water. But they also wondered whether, in a warming world, shade might actually improve crop productivity. “Shade will reduce transpiration needs and possibly increase water efficiency,” Dupraz wrote. The key would be finding the right balance between electricity produced by the solar panels and productive capacity of the farm.

At the end of three growing seasons, the researchers found that compromise was indeed possible. Not surprisingly, the crops under the full-density PVP shading lost nearly 50 percent of their productivity, compared to similar crops in the full-sun plots. However, the crops under the half-density shading were just as productive as the ones in the unshaded control plots; in a few cases, they were even more productive. (1)

The reason for this surprising outcome, according to Hélène Marrou, who studied lettuce in the plots, was the ability of plants to adapt to lower light conditions. She reported that lettuce plants adjusted by increasing their leaf area and by altering leaf arrangement to harvest light more efficiently.

She also had good news to report on the water front. “We showed in this experiment that shading irrigated vegetable crops with PVPs allowed a saving of 14 percent to 29 percent of evapotranspired water, depending on the level of shade created and the crop grown,” she wrote in a 2013 paper. (2) Within the context of global warming and water shortage, she said, reducing water demand by shading plants could represent a big advantage in the near future.

Source

Further reading:

(via kittensandscience)

557 notes

Survived first day back at work post “oh gods can’t leave the house” collapse. Hooray?

6 notes